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Back to Frequently Asked Questions



Frequently Asked Questions
regarding
THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN
A DOCTRINE AND A DOGMA.


Q. 1. What is the difference between a doctrine and a dogma? Are they the same?

A. 1. First of all, all dogmas are doctrines, but not all doctrines are dogmas.

A Dogma is a Doctrine that is infallibly taught by the Pope, using Sacred Scripture and Sacred Tradition as the source, and are irreversible.

The following are Catholic "Dogmas":

- The Unity and Trinity of God
- God the Creator
- God the Redeemer
- The Mother of the Redeemer
- God the Sanctifier
- The Catholic Church
- The Communion of Saints
- The Sacraments
- Baptism
- Confirmation
- Holy Eucharist
- Confession
- The Holy Orders
- Holy Matrimony
- The Last Rite
- The Last Things

A Doctrine is a Catholic teaching, that may or may not be infallible. Dogmas are infallible. For example, all the teachings that are found in the Catechism of the Catholic Church are "doctrines" that must be accepted with a religious submission of intellect and will, by all believers, including those parts not formally defined as dogma.



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